New Year – new project!

Today sees the start of the Trust’s new Heritage Lottery funded project ‘Imagined Land’, which, over the next two years, will explore and celebrate two of the Trust’s sites that sit at the heart of communities: Tasburgh and Burnham Norton.

During the last two years it has become clear to me that people often feel very strongly about their local Trust site, where they might walk regularly with their dog, visit with children and grand-children; or perhaps where they might have happy memories of playing and exploring when they were children themselves. This affection can extend into greater commitment to the site through volunteering roles - such as keeping an eye on the site as a warden, or getting involved with guiding or schools visits - and this obviously has great benefits for the site, and for the continuing work of the Trust. One of the aims of this project is to develop a model which provides opportunities for volunteers to share skills, knowledge and experience, and make connections across Trust sites.

In the first phase of the project we aim to extend our understanding of the earthworks at Tasburgh through documentary research, test-pitting and geophysical survey, working in partnership with CRP (Caistor Roman Project) and NAHRG (The Norfolk Archaeological & Historical Research Group). CRP members will help train new volunteers from the Tasburgh area in the techniques for planning, executing, and recording test-pits, and NAHRG members will mentor volunteers interested in documentary research. During and after the first phase at Tasburgh, these volunteers will share their experiences and skills with Burnham Norton participants, to help them get started on documentary research and test-pits focused on the Carmelite Friary.

At both sites the research material will be used as the starting point for creative arts work – such as writing (with support from the Writer’s Centre Norwich), music and craft making - culminating in pageants devised and created with local communities, including schools. In these ways it is hoped that everyone living in each community will be able to get involved in some way in exploring their own local site and, at the same time, become part of a wider Trust volunteering community.

If you like the sound of this and would like to know more, please do get in touch!: info@norfarchtrust.org.uk

New in brief

  • Saturday 14 January: Grundungsviertel Excavation Project, Excavating the oldest quarter of Lübeck Dr Dirk Rieger, Chief Archaeologist, UNESCO. 2.30pm at the Town Close Auditorium, Castle Museum, Norwich. NNAS lectures are free to all members; non-members are most welcome and are asked to leave a small donation. More info at www.nnas.info
  • Saturday 21 January NAHRG lectures:  “The Greatest Wealth of Our Country” :The Foldcourse in East Anglia. John Belcher (Food Industry, retired; recent UEA PhD). University of East Anglia (Room Arts 01.02) at 2.30 pm. Non-members are welcome to try one or two lectures before joining. More info at www.nahrg.org.uk
  • Saturday 4 February: The Brecks from Above: Re-mapping the archaeology of the Brecks. Sophie Tremlett, Historic Environment Service, Norfolk County Council. 2.30pm at the Town Close Auditorium, Castle Museum, Norwich. NNAS lectures are free to all members; non-members are most welcome and are asked to leave a small donation. More info at www.nnas.info